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Graphic Novels For Your School

In this section of the Bookshelf, you will find informative articles about how Graphic Novels, Comic Books, and similiar items can provide educators with a valuable and effective tool for teaching a broad range of important skills.

Before taking the plunge and using comic books in your instruction, you may be hesitant about the appropriateness of the content of the comic.
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In 1992, the comic book world found itself in unprecedented territory when Art Spiegelman won the Pulitzer Prize for his stunning Holocaust survival story, Maus. Since that watershed event, the mainstream acceptance of comics and graphic novels has only grown. Check out our comprehensive list of award-winning graphic novels here! (Updated regularly)
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Jennifer Haines details what makes comics great teaching tools by showing how they can be used to address each of Gardner's Multiple Intelligence types.
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Elementary teacher Jordan Kerkhoff provides four integral phases to implementing comics and graphic novels into a fifth grade classroom.
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Jordan Kerkhoff
Graphic novels serve a variety of purposes in educating developing readers, including bridging language barriers experienced by English-language learners (ELL). Check out a list of the best graphic novels for ELLs along with the benefits of the format for their education.
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Explore the history of the young adult genre in graphic novels and how it has pioneered the format into literary and academic acclaim.
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Social Studies teacher Tim Smyth provides a guide for getting graphic novels approved for his classroom and the impact they have had on his students.
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Tim Smyth
Teacher and comic shop owner Jennifer Haines examines the ways graphic novels can help students develop critical thinking skills.
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By Jennifer Haines
The Diamond Graphic Novel Common Core List offers graphic novels from DBD publishers that will fit into a Common Core curriculum, along with resources to help educators and librarians best utilize these materials. The list has been updated for 2015, with new titles and more features to make it easier to use.
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Ellen Myrick - President of Myrick Marketing & Media and creator of the Diamond Book Distributors Graphic Novel Common Core List - offers instructional examples of how four titles from the Diamond Graphic Novel Common Core List can be used to fit into the new standards.
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By Ellen Myrick
High school English teacher Maureen Bakis demonstrates how graphic novels can be used in class within the Common Core State Standards.
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By Maureen Bakis
Librarian Caitlin Plovnick explores how comics and graphic novels can benefit research instruction.
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By Caitlin Plovnick
University of North Florida assistant professor of literacy Dr. Katie Monnin explains the benefits of the Common Core Standards, and how graphic novels fit into the program.
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Graphic novels are a staple item of many public libraries, but as BookShelf explains, they also have an important role to play in school libraries and media centers as well.
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Living in a strange country, surrounded by sounds of incomprehensible language is nerve-wracking for anyone.
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by Natsuko K. Chow
Peter Gutiérrez, creator of a number of teaching guides for comics and graphic novels, including TOON Book’s Little Mouse Gets Ready and Bloomsbury’s Rapunzel’s Revenge, discusses the ins and outs of creating reading guides, teaching guides and lesson plans to accompany graphic novels. In addition, BookShelf presents a list of recommended resources.
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Peter Gutiérrez
BookShelf presents Comics in Education, a series dedicated to talking with educators about their use of graphic novels in the classroom and the benefits they have had in their curriculum. In this series, BookShelf interviews English professor and Director of Women's and Gender Studies, Colleen Lutz Clemens, of Kutztown University.
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Ashley Kronsberg
BookShelf presents Comics in Education, a series dedicated to talking with educators about their use of graphic novels in the classroom and the benefits they have had in their curriculum. In this series, BookShelf interviews professor and literary researcher, Derek Newman-Stille.
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Ashley Kronsberg
BookShelf presents Comics in Education, a series dedicated to talking with educators about their use of graphic novels in the classroom and the benefits they have had in their curriculum. In this series, BookShelf interviews English professor Stephen Sohn of UC Riverside.
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Ashley Kronsberg
BookShelf presents Comics in Education, a series dedicated to talking with educators about their use of graphic novels in the classroom and the benefits they have had in their curriculum. In this edition, BookShelf interviews Tim Smyth, a high school social studies teacher and former Social Studies Department Chair.
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Ashley Kronsberg
High school English teacher Maureen Bakis discusses her new book The Graphic Novel Classroom, her experiences teaching with comics, and offers advice for other educators.
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We speak with author, assistant professor, and BookShelf contributor Dr. Katie Monnin about her new book, Teaching Early Reader Comics and Graphic Novels.
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Many educators have begun to realize something that long-time comic book readers have always known: comics are valuable.
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BookShelf contributor Maureen Bakis talks with Columbia Teachers College doctoral student Nick Sousanis, who is in the process of submitting his dissertation in comics form.
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High school English teacher and graphic novel advocate Maureen Bakis reports on a series of Harvard University workshops on teaching with graphic novels, and includes resources for those who couldn't attend.
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High school English teacher John C. Weaver discusses how he uses graphic novels to show the interaction between visuals and narrative, using DC Comics' Watchmen.
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In this edition of BookShelf's continuing series, we focus on comics and graphic novels which cover math and problem solving.
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This month, BookShelf takes a look at a number of graphic novels with scientific themes and examines each one's unique approach and appeal to readers.
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Science teacher Nathan Tubbs describes his experiences teaching students how to make their own comics, and what they - and he - learned in the process.
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By Nathan Tubbs