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Graphic Novels For Your Library

In this section of the Bookshelf, you will find informative articles on how to add Graphic Novels to your collections as well as how those and similar items can provide librarians with a valuable and effective tool for teaching a broad range of important skills.

Deciding to include comic books and graphic novels in your collection is the first step into a larger world. Now, you must decide what to do once you're there.
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Caitlin McGurk, head librarian of the Center for Cartoon Studies' Schulz Library, offers tips for libraries seeking to increase their collections through donations, using methods that have proven effective for her library.
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By Caitlin McGurk
You have started your graphic novel collection! Now, you need to take care of the niggling details, such as how to catalog graphic novels, and where to shelve them.
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by Kat Kan
Librarian Justin Switzer answers the question of where the best place to shelve the influx of biographical novels is within a library.
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By Justin Switzer
School Library Journal announces the best of everything in 2016 including Graphic Novels, Audio Books, and more!
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Librarian David Serchay examines the ins and outs of effectively determining age ratings for graphic novels aimed at younger readers.
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BookShelf speaks with New York Public Library Senior Librarian Thomas Knowlton about the library's adult graphic novel collection.
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One of the biggest advantages of including graphic novels in your library is the medium's appeal to a demographic that traditionally shuns the library: young males.
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Volume 43, Issue 2 of the Journal of Academic Librarianship features a new research article written by Academic Outreach Librarian, Aimee Slatera, and Metadata Coordinatory, Ann Kardos, from Brandeis University titled Graphic Novels: Collecting, Cataloging, and Outreach in an Academic Library.
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Marrying the mission of the National Center for Creative Aging with the popularity of comics promotes healthy aging among senior community.
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If there’s one thing librarians are always looking for, it’s new ideas for programs, especially programs that tie-in with the books in their collection.  Graphic novels offer a lot of possibilities for programming for all ages and all budgets.  Because of their combination of art and words, graphic novels allow for programs exploring writing, drawing, crafts, and more. Writer and former Teen Librarian Snow Wildsmith offers ideas for graphic novel programming, broken down by their estimated costs and/or estimated planning time.
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YA Librarian Christian Zabriskie makes the case for graphic novels as high return-on-investment items.
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Young Adult Librarian Justin Switzer makes the case that pop culture-themed library events can be not only fun, but also beneficial to libraries and their patrons.
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By Justin Switzer
Librarian Justin Switzer rates websites that allow users to make their own comic strips.
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By Justin Switzer
Comic- and graphic novel-themed events can be highly successful and engaging for patrons and library workers alike. Here, Diamond BookShelf offers 10 suggestions for easy (and cheap) events.
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Librarian David Serchay takes a look at graphic novels that have crossed over by winning major literary awards.
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By David S. Serchay