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Graphic Novels For Your Library

In this section of the Bookshelf, you will find informative articles on how to add Graphic Novels to your collections as well as how those and similar items can provide librarians with a valuable and effective tool for teaching a broad range of important skills.

Since its creation, Robert Kirkman's The Walking Dead has become a household name nation-wide. Find out how to bring these zombie fans to your doorstep by hosting your own Walking Dead Viewing Party for the AMC mid-season premier on February 12, 2017.
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Image Comics launches new bi-monthly newsletter catered towards librarians with a mission to support libraries by offering new and exciting ways to utilize Image graphic novels in their institutes.
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School Library Journal announces the best of everything in 2016 including Graphic Novels, Audio Books, and more!
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Deciding to include comic books and graphic novels in your collection is the first step into a larger world. Now, you must decide what to do once you're there.
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Caitlin McGurk, head librarian of the Center for Cartoon Studies' Schulz Library, offers tips for libraries seeking to increase their collections through donations, using methods that have proven effective for her library.
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By Caitlin McGurk
You have started your graphic novel collection! Now, you need to take care of the niggling details, such as how to catalog graphic novels, and where to shelve them.
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by Kat Kan
Librarian Justin Switzer answers the question of where the best place to shelve the influx of biographical novels is within a library.
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By Justin Switzer
Monthly comic books are collected in numerous editions, often packaging the same material in new volumes. Youth Services Librarian David Serchay examines the various options available to libraries, with an eye to what's best for them.
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By David Serchay
Youth Services Librarian David Serchay continues to weigh the issues involved in purchasing multiple collections containing overlapping material, with recent examples from Marvel and DC Comics.
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By David Serchay
Selecting and cataloging Marvel and DC Comics series can be challenging with the numerous relaunches of each publisher's lines. Librarian David Serchay examines the situation and what to do about it.
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By David S. Serchay
Comic- and graphic novel-themed events can be highly successful and engaging for patrons and library workers alike. Here, Diamond BookShelf offers 10 suggestions for easy (and cheap) events.
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Comic conventions have become huge events, bringing fans together to celebrate their favorite hobbies with one another. Libraries can tap into this excitement and utilize their graphic novel collections by hosting their own mini-cons. BookShelf spoke with a number of librarians who share their experiences hosting mini-cons.
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By Mark Banaszak
Justin Switzer, Young Adult Librarian at Baltimore's Enoch Pratt Free Library, shows how libraries can bring together maker and comics communities with cosplay-inspired programming.
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By Justin Switzer
Young Adult Librarian Justin Switzer makes the case that pop culture-themed library events can be not only fun, but also beneficial to libraries and their patrons.
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By Justin Switzer
Librarian David Serchay examines the ins and outs of effectively determining age ratings for graphic novels aimed at younger readers.
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Mark Banaszack interviews Wes Young about his experience teaching the Graphic Endeavors class for adults.
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If there’s one thing librarians are always looking for, it’s new ideas for programs, especially programs that tie-in with the books in their collection.  Graphic novels offer a lot of possibilities for programming for all ages and all budgets.  Because of their combination of art and words, graphic novels allow for programs exploring writing, drawing, crafts, and more. Writer and former Teen Librarian Snow Wildsmith offers ideas for graphic novel programming, broken down by their estimated costs and/or estimated planning time.
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YA Librarian Christian Zabriskie makes the case for graphic novels as high return-on-investment items.
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Librarian Justin Switzer rates websites that allow users to make their own comic strips.
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By Justin Switzer
BookShelf speaks with Karen Green, librarian at Columbia University in New York City, about her work in establishing and keeping up the school's graphic novel collection.
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Caitlin Plovnick profiles Ohio State University's Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum, and speaks with curator Cailtin McGurk about the Library's current and future plans.
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By Caitlin Plovnick
BookShelf speaks with New York Public Library Senior Librarian Thomas Knowlton about the library's adult graphic novel collection.
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One of the biggest advantages of including graphic novels in your library is the medium's appeal to a demographic that traditionally shuns the library: young males.
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Librarian David Serchay takes a look at graphic novels that have crossed over by winning major literary awards.
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By David S. Serchay
Budget cuts are running rampant in libraries around the country, yet more and more graphic novels are being published. The question then becomes, "with an even more limited budget, what should I buy?"
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Librarian David Serchay helps navigate Marvel and DC Comics' latest multi-volume crossover event series, with recommendations for which volume to choose.
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By David S. Serchay
On the tenth anniversary of the 2002 YALSA "Get Graphic @ Your Library" pre-conference, youth services librarian David Serchay reflects on the event and the subsequent growth of graphic novels in the library.
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By David Serchay